Tesis doctoral en la redInfoling 4.12 (2013)

Autor/ra:Buendía Castro, Miriam
Fecha de lectura o defensa:8 de marzo de 2013
Título de la tesis:Phraseology in Specialized Language and its Representation in Environmental Knowledge Resources
Director/a de la tesis:Pamela Faber Benítez
Codirección:Clara Inés López Rodríguez
Universidad:Universidad de Granada
Departamento:Departamento de Traducción e Interpretación
País:España
Descripción de la tesisThis research presents the design of a template for encoding and describing phraseological information in the environmental knowledge base, EcoLexicon (ecolexicon.ugr.es). One of the objectives of this study was to formulate a methodology that could also be used to codify phraseological information in other specialized knowledge domains. The focus of our analysis was on verb collocations (verb+noun, noun+verb) because of the need to enrich specialized knowledge resources with information regarding predicates and their arguments. As is well known, verbs are an extremely important part of language since, in a manner of speaking, they set the scene or establish the structure for the rest of the sentence. However, very few specialized knowledge resources include them.

The phraseological template proposed in this research takes its theoretical premises from cognitive approaches to Terminology, namely, Sociocognitive Terminology and Frame-based Terminology. In addition, assumptions from linguistic models that deal with predicate argument structure were also included, such as the Lexical Grammar Model, Lexical Constructional Model, Role and Reference Grammar, and FrameNet.

The practical guidelines for the design of our template were based on a detailed analysis of the most representative lexicographic and terminographic resources that contain phraseological information. A set of the most important meaning-based resources for verb description was also analyzed. The underlying idea of our research is that verbs and their potential arguments can be classified and structured in a set of conceptual-semantic categories typical of a given specialized domain. In this context, when semantic roles and macroroles are specified as well as the resulting phrase structure, it is then possible to establish templates that represent this meaning for entire frames. In this regard, within the context of a specialized knowledge domain, the range of verbs generally associated with potential arguments can be predicted within the frame of a specialized event. This occurs, of course, because the nature of arguments is constrained by verb meaning. However, it is our assertion that this influence is reciprocal since in specialized language, verbs are also to some extent constrained by their arguments. In this regard, there is an interaction between the meaning components of the entities and processes activated in specialized knowledge event representations.

Finally, the results of our analysis have been implemented in EcoLexicon. As shown, the methodology proposed in this thesis for encoding and describing verbal collocations in terminographic resources is useful both for text comprehension and text production.

Keywords: collocations, specialized resources, frames
Área temática:Terminología, Traducción
Tesis completa en el Archivo de Infoling: http://www.infoling.org/repository/ID/100
ÍndiceABSTRACT
SUMMARY OF THIS DOCTORAL THESIS IN SPANISH

0. INTRODUCTION
0.1 HYPOTHESIS
0.2 OBJECTIVES
0.3 OUTLINE OF THE THESIS

1. COGNITIVE-BASED THEORIES OF TERMINOLOGY
1.1 INTRODUCTION
1.2 DISTINCTION BETWEEN LEXICOLOGY/LEXICOGRAPHY AND TERMINOLOGY/TERMINOGRAPHY
1.3 LEXICOLOGY: THE FUNCTION THEORY OF LEXICOGRAPHY
1.3.1 Types of user situation
1.3.1.1 Cognitive situations
1.3.1.2 Communicative situations
1.3.1.3 Operational situations
1.3.1.4 Summary of user situations
1.3.2 Type of users
1.4 TERMINOLOGY: COGNITIVE-BASED THEORIES OF TERMINOLOGY
1.4.1 From Wüster to the cognitive-based Theories of Terminology: brief summary
1.4.2 Sociocognitive Terminology Theory
1.4.3. Frame-based Terminology
1.4.3.1 Knowledge extraction in Frame-based Terminology
Dictionary analysis
Corpus analysis
1.4.3.2. Practical application: EcoLexicon
1.4.3.2.1 Conceptual information
Semantic relations and definitions
Graphical information
1.4.3.2.2 Linguistic information
Usage contexts
1.5 THE TRANSLATION PROCESS AND THE USER NEEDS OF ECOLEXICON

2. PHRASEOLOGY IN LEXICOGRAPHY AND TERMINOGRAPHY
2.1 PHRASEOLOGY
2.1.1 Introduction
2.1.2 The notion of phraseology and phraseological unit
2.1.3 Approaches to the study of collocations
2.1.3.1 Semantically-based approach
Benson
Hausmann
Mel’čuk: The Meaning-Text Theory and the Explanatory Combinatorial Dictionary
2.1.3.2 Frequency-oriented approach
2.1.4 Collocation: definition and access
2.1.4.1 Collocations vs. Free phrases
2.1.4.2 Collocations vs. Idioms
2.1.4.2 Collocations vs. Compounds
2.2 PHRASEOLOGY IN LEXICOGRAPHIC RESOURCES
2.2.1 Phraseology in monolingual general dictionaries
2.2.2 Phraseology in bilingual general dictionaries
2.2.3 Phraseology in collocations or combinatorial dictionaries
The BBI Dictionary of English Word Combinations
Oxford Collocations Dictionary
MacMillan Collocations Dictionary
Redes. Diccionario combinatorio del español contemporáneo
Diccionario combinatorio práctico del español contemporáneo
Diccionario de Colocaciones del Español
2.3 PHRASEOLOGY IN TERMINOGRAPHIC RESOURCES
2.3.1 Domain of accounting/economy/business/law
Lexique de cooccurrents—Bourse et conjuncture économique
Caignon’s accounting dictionaries
Dictionnaire contextuel du français économique (DICOFE)
Dictionnaire d’apprentissage du français des affaires (DAFA)
The Accounting Dictionaries: Diccionario inglés-español de contabilidad
Diccionario de Términos económicos, financieros y comerciales (inglés-español, Spanish-English)
2.3.2 Domain of computing and the Internet
Internet. Répertoire bilingue de combinaisons lexicales spécialisées français anglais
Dictionnaire fondamental de l’informatique et de l’Internet (DiCoInfo)
2.3.3 Domain of the environment
Dictionnaire fondamental de l’environnement (DiCoEnviro)
2.3.4 Multiple domains
Termium Plus®
2.4 SUMMARY

3. THEORIES OF ARGUMENT STRUCTURE
3.1 THEORIES OF ARGUMENT STRUCTURE
3.1.1 Formal theories
3.1.1.1 Lexicon Grammar
3.1.1.2 Lexical Syntax (Sintaxis Léxica)
3.1.1.3 Linking rules approach
3.1.2 Functional theories
3.1.2.1 Lexical Grammar Model
3.1.2.1.1 The concept of lexical domain
3.1.2.1.2 The paradigmatic axis
3.1.2.1.3 The syntagmatic axis
3.1.2.1.4 The cognitive axis
3.1.2.2 Role and Reference Grammar
3.1.2.2.1 Aktionsart types
3.1.2.2.2 Logical structures
3.1.2.2.3 Thematic roles and macroroles
3.1.3 Functional-cognitive theories
3.1.3.1 Langacker’s Cognitive Grammar
3.1.3.2 Frame Semantics and FrameNet
3.1.3.3 Construction Grammar
3.1.3.4 Lexical Constructional Model
3.1.3.4.1 Lexical templates
3.2 ARGUMENT STRUCTURE AS CODIFIED IN LEXICAL RESOURCES
3.2.1 WordNet
3.2.2 VerbNet
3.2.3 PropBank
3.2.4 ADESSE
3.2.5 SenSem
3.3 SUMMARY

4. MATERIALS AND METHODS
4.1 OBJECT OF STUDY: NATURAL HAZARDS OR THE EXTREME EVENT
4.2 DESIGN, COMPILATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE CORPUS
4.2.1 Basic notions of corpus
4.2.1.1 The concept of corpus
4.2.1.2 Types of corpus
Way of transmission
Language
Quantity of text
Specialization of the language
Time period
Codification
Summary
4.2.2 Methods and criteria for corpus compilation
4.2.2.1 The Web for Corpus approach
4.2.2.1.1 Evaluation of online resources
4.2.2.1.2 Protocol for the Evaluation of On-Line Resources
Authority
Content
Design
Summary
4.2.2.2 The Web as Corpus approach
The Web as a Corpus surrogate
The Web as a corpus supermarket
The mega-corpus or mini Web
4.2.3 Characteristics of the corpus
4.3 COMPUTER SOFTWARE
4.3.1 TermoStat
4.3.2 Wordsmith Tools
4.4. CONCLUSION

5. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
5.1. INTRODUCTION
5.2 DESCRIPTION OF THE EXTREME EVENT: CONCEPTUAL ORGANIZATION
5.3 EXTRACTION OF THE CANDIDATE VERBS
5.4 VERB ANALYSIS
5.4.1 Top down analyis
5.4.2 Bottom-up analysis: study of concordances for the selected verbs
5.4.2.1 Argument analysis and description
5.4.2.1.1 Linguistic realizations of arguments and assignment of semantic tags/labels for establishing conceptual categories
5.4.2.1.2 Assignment of roles to the arguments
5.4.2.1.3 Morphosyntax of arguments (phrase types)
5.4.2.2 Verb/predicate description
5.4.2.2.1 Differentiating verb senses and their English-Spanish correspondences
5.4.3 Verb Information tables
5.4.3.1 Domain of EXISTENCE
To begin to exist
To begin to exist from sth else
To begin to exist becoming sth else
To cause to exist/happen
To exist in time
To continue to exist (of natural disaster)
To continue to exist (of people)
To cease to exist
To cease to exist in the perception of others
To cause sb to cease to exist
To cause to cease to exist_(of fire disaster)
5.4.3.2 Domain of ACTION
To come against sth with sudden force
To (cause) to come apart (of construction artefacts)
To produce fire
5.4.3.2 Domain of CHANGE
To cause to change for the worse
5.4.3.4 Domain of MOVEMENT
To move forcefully
To move slowly
To (cause) to move vertically
To move horizontally over a large space
To cause motion
5.4.3.5 Domain of POSITION
To put sth on top of or over sth
To put water over/in a space
5.5 IMPLEMENTATION OF PHRASEOLOGICAL INFORMATION IN ECOLEXICON
5.5.1 Storing and recording information
5.5.2 The macrostructure: ways of accessing collocations
5.5.3 The microstructure of entries
5.5.4. Summary

6. CONCLUSIONS

7. REFERENCES

APPENDIX 1. DEFINITIONS OF ENGLISH AND SPANISH VERBS CLASSIFIED IN LEXICAL DOMAINS
Número de págs.:605


Fecha de publicación en Infoling:4 de abril de 2013
Remitente:
Miriam Buendía Castro
Universidad de Granada
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